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In a remarkable display of their musical range and sensitivity, the buoyant alto sax of Adderley and introspective piano of Evans move effortlessly toward a middle ground that shows both to great advantage. Recorded in 1961, the sound quality of these master tapes is breathtaking: a real audiophile dream disc! Featuring Percy Heath on bass and Connie Kay on drums.

Originally released in 1961.

Cannonball Adderley, saxophone (alto)
Bill Evans, piano
Percy Heath, bass
Connie Kay, drums

The second of trumpeter Freddie Hubbard's two Impulse albums features the 25-year old in three separate settings. He is heard along with a tenor-saxophonist backed by strings ("Skylark," "I Got It Bad" and "Chocolate Shake" are all given beautiful treatments), with a 16-piece band and in a septet with Eric Dolphy and Wayne Shorter. This well-rounded and highly recommended showcase shows why Freddie Hubbard was considered the top trumpeter to emerge during the early '60s.

Mastered by Kevin Gray.

Freddie Hubbard, trumpet
Art Davis, bass
Tommy Flanagan, piano
Curtis Fuller, trombone
John Gilmore, tenor saxophone
Louis Hayes, drums
Analogue Productions' Blue Note and Nat "King" Cole Reissues WIN A Positive Feedback 2010 Brutus Award!
"...if you haven't picked up every one of the Blue Note and Nat King Cole reissues from Chad Kassem and company at Acoustic Sounds, you're really missing out!" - David W. Robinson, Positive Feedback, Issue 52

One of Mobley's best, this album features two 1963 all-star quintets: one with Lee Morgan and Andrew Hill, the other with Donald Byrd and Herbie Hancock. Philly Joe Jones is the driving force throughout.

Hank Mobley, tenor saxophone
Andrew Hill, piano
John Ore, bass
Philly Joe Jones, drums
Donald Byrd, trumpet
Herbie Hancock, piano
Lee Morgan, trumpet
Butch Warren, bass
Analogue Productions' Blue Note and Nat "King" Cole Reissues WIN A Positive Feedback 2010 Brutus Award!
"...if you haven't picked up every one of the Blue Note and Nat King Cole reissues from Chad Kassem and company at Acoustic Sounds, you're really missing out!" - David W. Robinson, Positive Feedback, Issue 52

Every single tune on this album from the haunting "Maiden Voyage" to the gentle, swinging "Dolphin Dance" has found its way into the standard jazz repertoire. Herbie Hancock fashioned a modern jazz milestone with extraordinary compositions, interplay and solos.

Originally released in 1965.

Herbie Hancock, piano
Ron Carter, bass
George Coleman, tenor saxophone
Freddie Hubbard, trumpet
Anthony Williams, drums

Right from the very first hearing, absolutely every single jazz critic shared the same opinion - whether trained musicians or not, true or would-be jazz expert: A Love Supreme is John Coltrane's most important recording. And the rave reviews which appeared in the magazines Downbeat, Jazz Hot, Jazz Podium and Swingjournal reflected this: critics all over the world, in America, Europe and Japan recognized that Coltrane's deep religious belief had influenced both his approach to life and his music-making. It not only enabled him to express himself with great intensity but also lent him the necessary inner peace to conceive a work of almost 40 minutes in length and to lead his quartet along the same path as himself.

Recorded in 1964.

Mastered by Kevin Gray.

John Coltrane, tenor saxophone
Jimmy Garrison, bass
Elvin Jones, drums
McCoy Tyner, piano

John Lee Hooker himself did not know his exact date of birth. If he hadn't died at around the age of 80, this ageless musician would still be easily pulling the next generation to his gigs. Hooker remains a phenomenon, a mysterious figure of black rhythm and blues, a charismatic king who reigns supreme in rock 'n' roll's Hall of Fame. John W. Peters described his music as a synthesis of scorching emotional ardour, unrelenting rhythmic intensity, and original poetry of a highly personal character. Anyone hearing him for the first time may well be startled at the unfiltered passion and power of his music.

And another surprise is in store for those who compare Hooker's late recordings with those made in the Sixties. His unmistakable, raw voice has fully matured, but his incantory style of singing appears markedly finer and more flexible. And then there is the perfect gem of a rhythm group whose sinewy sounds fill the grooves with merciless gravitational force. It's enough to make your spine tingle!

Mastered by Kevin Gray.

John Lee Hooker, guitar, vocals
David "Panama" Francis, drums
Joe Galbreath, guitar
Milt Hinton, bass
William Wells, trombone
"...Let me cut to the chase here and recommend that you buy two copies - one to enjoy and the other to hold for resale, because some day Acoustic Sounds' license will run out and lots of jazz fans will be kicking themselves for not buying a copy. Kevin Gray has turned out a perfect remastering job and this is my choice for reissue of the year." Recording = 10/10; Music = 10/10 - Dennis Davis, Hi-Fi+, Issue 68

As Oliver Nelson is known primarily as a big band leader and arranger, he is lesser known as a saxophonist and organizer of small ensembles. Blues And The Abstract Truth is his triumph as a musician for the aspects of not only defining the sound of an era with his all-time classic "Stolen Moments," but on this recording, assembling one of the most potent modern jazz sextets ever. Lead trumpeter Freddie Hubbard is at his peak of performance, while alto saxophonists Nelson and Eric Dolphy (Nelson doubling on tenor) team to for an unlikely union that was simmered to perfection. Bill Evans (piano), Paul Chambers (bass) and Roy Haynes (drums) can do no wrong as a rhythm section.

Originally released in 1961.

Mastered by Kevin Gray.

Oliver Nelson, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone
George Barrow, baritone saxophone
Paul Chambers, bass
Eric Dolphy, flute, alto saxophone
Bill Evans, piano
Roy Haynes, drums
Freddie Hubbard, trumpet

Mastered off the original two-track tape recorded with a tube AKG-C12 microphone on a tube Ampex 350 machine. Features Ray Brown on bass and Shelly Manne on drums. Over his long and distinguished career, Sonny Rollins has made many dozens of albums. Among those recorded during the fifties, Prestige's Movin' Out and Colossus, Blue Note's A Night at the Village Vanguard, Riverside's The Sound of Sonny, and Way Out West on Contemporary qualify as all-time Rollins classics.

The session for Way Out West, Rollins' first ever in California, was called for 3 a.m. to accommodate everyone's busy schedules. Sonny, who could never be accused of overstatement, announced after four hours of recording: "I'm hot now."

"This SACD reveals the musician's dynamic shadings like never before. Stereo it is, but the sound is so three-dimensional that I didn't mind the lack of 5.1 surround mix. To be honest, I'm thankful they didn't tamper with this classic. I've heard too many botched attempts. The whole affair feels very live, very in the moment - you know, like a jazz record." - Steve Guttenberg, Home Theater

Recorded in 1957.

Sonny Rollins, saxophone (tenor)
Ray Brown, bass
Shelly Manne, drums

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